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  #11  
Old 04-06-2011
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Lol.
I am sure.
How true, I have come across many in the business who leave, and state that they don't get paid enough. Of course, just like any job, you have good and bad, and must make the best of it.
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  #12  
Old 04-06-2011
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I appreciate that.
And yes, we here in Jersey are considered Jersey Boy's or Girls, and sometimes Jerseyans. Nice to meet you and it's good to hear from another for Jersey, I am from South Jersey which should be a totally different part of the map, kinda like Virginia and W. Virginia. lol
I'm from North/central about 15-20 minutes from NYC, that is if there's no traffic trying to get through the bridges/tunnels!

And yes, the two parts of the state are totally different. The way I speak, people have mistaken me for a New Yorker. I still remember calling Trenton to apply for a scholarship when I was in high school (College?) and being told that the scholarship was only open to New Jersey residents. I told them I was from NJ, only to be told that I sounded like a New Yorker. (I have been living in NJ since I was 5 years old, other than when I went to vet. school since NJ does not have its own; I still kept my permanent address as NJ though.)

As far as anything good/new at this end of the business.... not really. People still think of vets. as farmers pretty much. Don't seem to appreciate the fact that we are doctors and can treat multiple species, even a human if necessary. My clients were stunned a few years back when I had to call paramedics in for a client that passed out in my office; I was the one who was working on her to make sure that she was breathing, etc. and that her vitals were ok until the paramedics arrived. Just wish the world would catch up as far as understanding what licenses are supposed to mean.
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  #13  
Old 04-06-2011
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By the way Beastmaster, I was not sure who you were responding to with the multiple responses. In case you did not know, if you hit the quote button, it will quote the person who you are responding to. You can delete parts of the quote if you do not need/want to comment on everything said. It makes it a little easier to follow conversations when multiple people are commenting.
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  #14  
Old 04-06-2011
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Welcome to the fray Beast Master.

Speaking of accents, it’s really quite interesting around here. D/FW has been a cultural melting pot for years now and it is getting into the language. There are reportedly 5 different dialects of Texan, but until the last few years no native Texas would every say “guys”, it was always “y’all”. Any soft drink was a coke, but now “soda” is the generic term. I worked with a lady from California, but her family was originally from the mid-west, anyway she talked sooo slooow thaaat iiit drooove mee nuts. I have also worked with somebody else, I forget where he was from, that spoke at 100 MPH, with no inflection or intonation in his voice, and then would stop abruptly. I would be leaning forward, straining to hear what he was saying, then when he would suddenly stop I tended to want to fall over.
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  #15  
Old 04-06-2011
DRNEGRIN6 DRNEGRIN6 is offline
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Originally Posted by Getting too old View Post
I have also worked with somebody else, I forget where he was from, that spoke at 100 MPH, with no inflection or intonation in his voice, and then would stop abruptly. I would be leaning forward, straining to hear what he was saying, then when he would suddenly stop I tended to want to fall over.
I'm a 100 mph person myself, especially when I get nervous. I'll really give you a laugh.... on one call (I was the vet. not the ACO), an ACO asked me to back him up. I went through a tight area between a car, a garage and a 4 ft fence (car behind me, garage to my left, fence to my right). In front of me was a 3 ft long piece of plywood blocking my path (leaning on the fence, bottom touching the garage). The dog was on the other side of the plywood growling at me. My snare could just barely reach the dog's head if I tried to get him. If I put the pole down to protect my legs, the dog could just over the top of the plywood and get my neck. If I held the snare upward, the dog could potentially crawl under the plywood and grab my leg.

For a split second, I panicked and started yelling Sit, Stay, No.....whatever else came to my head.... at the dog. I was speaking so fast and loud that the dog just stood there and cocked his head sort like, "What's wrong with you??" That's when I made my move and snared the dog. Then I was in for a fight with the dog. The area was so tight that I could not turn myself around let alone turn the dog to put the dog in front of me. I had to make the dog jump over the plywood and pull him out of the area while backing up and feeling my way out of the area with my legs. Not fun!!!

I guess that is one instance where fast talking .... even if it was to a dog.... got me out of their in one piece.
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  #16  
Old 04-06-2011
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Well, you know you're in New Jersey if you're going to the "shore" and everybody else goes to the "beach". LOL
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  #17  
Old 04-07-2011
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Welcome to the board!

Dialects and "local termanology" are always a fascination to me. I, being from the South, usually refer to Y'all as Northerners, (or, well... Yankees).

In ND, they still refer to a soft drink as a pop. I remember well, in Tn. that you would ask what flavored Coke y'all'd want. Elsewhere It's referred to as a soda

IN ND if you ask for a burger with lettuce and tomato, they call it a California Burger. In California, a California Burger has bean sprouts and avacado.

I'll never break my wife from referring to the Highway Patrol, or state trouper as CHP, no matter what state we're in. When I was little, used to be Expressways were what is known as an Interstate on the West Coast.

In the South, you sack your groceries. On the West Coast you bag them.

Thousands of interesting differences.

NOW... If my wife would stop playing with the smilies, while I try to type this i'd really
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  #18  
Old 04-08-2011
DRNEGRIN6 DRNEGRIN6 is offline
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Dialects and "local termanology" are always a fascination to me. I, being from the South, usually refer to Y'all as Northerners, (or, well... Yankees).

You made me laugh with the terminology. Just for your information, if you are driving a car with NJ plates and you stop in Pennsylvania and ask, "How do you get to NY?," make sure you specify NY state.

Several years ago when I was driving to vet. school in NYS, I was forced off the road by a car that was trying to get me to pull over. I often drove alone to school, about a 4 hour drive. Now that I think about it, it had to be in 1992 or 1993 since it was before I got my dog, who was my traveling companion. Anyway, I knew I would be in trouble if I pulled over since this car was basically swerving in and out of traffic trying to get me into the shoulder and/or in front of my car to stop. I saw an opportunity to go down and off ramp where only one car would fit. It was dangerous since anyone that travels through Pennsylvania to get to upstate NY, knows that the roads often take routes through the mountains, etc. This is where I was. I could see the tree tops and one wrong move was going to send me off the road and into a tree. The road was also covered with snow and I was going about 55 down this ramp that was marked as 25 mph. God must have been with me that night since after several minutes of trying to get that car off the mountain exit ramp, I made it to the rest stop below. It was quite a height and had the car gone airborne, I would have been killed.

After I stopped shaking, I asked the gas attendant, "How do I get to NY?" He tried sending me back towards NJ. I told him that he was sending back the way I came and I was just trying to find the ramp that led back to the road that I was just forced off of. After much discussion and pointing at maps, I realized that he was trying to send me back to New York City, not upstate New York. From the area that I grew up in NJ, upstate New York is either called upstate New York or just New York. If we were referring to New York City, we usually said "The City".
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  #19  
Old 04-08-2011
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My mother was from a little farming community in east Texas, and often they don’t even have street signs because everybody knows every street in town. And it is one of those cliché deals when you ask directions because they will tell you to go to where Joe’s barn used to be, turn right and go to where Sam’s tree was struck by lightning…..

Dr N., I found it humorous when you said “I'm from North/central about 15-20 minutes from NYC” because I had been told by my California coworker that Texans were the only people in the US that used time instead of mileage when relating distance.
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  #20  
Old 04-08-2011
DRNEGRIN6 DRNEGRIN6 is offline
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My mother was from a little farming community in east Texas, and often they don’t even have street signs because everybody knows every street in town. And it is one of those cliché deals when you ask directions because they will tell you to go to where Joe’s barn used to be, turn right and go to where Sam’s tree was struck by lightning…..

Dr N., I found it humorous when you said “I'm from North/central about 15-20 minutes from NYC” because I had been told by my California coworker that Texans were the only people in the US that used time instead of mileage when relating distance.
That's funny about the directions (i.e. turn at Joe's barn, etc.). That's how a lot of people give directions here. I can't stand it since I'm a street sign person myself. I don't see the building/mail box, etc. that someone is referring to until I pass it. (Last call, PD sent me to a dog hit by a car. There location, the church at so and so intersection; saw the street signs for the intersection; missed the church until the police officer used his flashlight to signal me.)

As far as describing the location by time rather than distance, most of us use distance except near NYC. There are a lot of highways around in this area so I guess people are more concerned how long it's going to take you to get to the location rather than how far away you really are. When applying for ACO work in this area, most of the time they state it as how far you live based on how long it is going to take you to get there rather than how far you actually live from the location. That's when I use my GPS to calculate the time it will take me to get to a call before I call in. It's no longer a distance than but timing thing.

It's funny. Within the town that my practice is in, it can take me longer to get across town than it takes me to get to the tunnels/bridges entering NYC (from the NJ side) since once I'm on the highway, I can get to the location quickly if there is little to no traffic.
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