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Old 06-07-2009
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Question Dogsbite.org

Hey guys and gals out there, do any of you check out the web site Dogsbite.org?? If so, tell me what you think about it. If not please check it out and let me know what you think. Thanks
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Old 06-07-2009
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Well, if they would forget about the Bull Sh** Legislation and push for legislation based on the actions of the animal/owner, then I might think it was worth while.
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Old 06-07-2009
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I hate it. It is not the breed, it is the owner.

I had a St Barnard bite a 12 year old in the face resulting in 97 stitches. This dog literally almost bite the child's face off. But this web site does not care about this dog incident cause it is not a Pit bull. The child was hanging out at his friends house, no adult supervision. The adults heard a scream inside the house and saw the child bleeding everywhere. Like a said at the top of my post, it is not the breed, it is the owner.

Cheers, Scooterchic
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Old 06-07-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooterchic View Post
I hate it. It is not the breed, it is the owner.
Sometimes it's not the owner or the breed, just the individual dog. Had one yesterday, 47 pound boxer / JRT mix just went off on the owner and she ended up hospitalized with several bite lacerations down to the bone on her arms.
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Old 06-07-2009
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Originally Posted by Caninelaw View Post
Sometimes it's not the owner or the breed, just the individual dog.

And sometimes it is the situation the dog is in at the time. My own dog when she was about 2 years old, attacked me when I was sleeping on the sofa. I was a vet. student at the time. I rolled over and did not know that the dog had crawled onto the sofa with me. I knocked her off the sofa; she went for my neck as I slept. I was lucky in the sense that she growled as she attacked. I heard the growl and grabbed her first before she grabbed me.

I took her to the veterinary school's behaviorist who stated that she had to be euthanized due to aggression. I was able to train her to accept me and my family but no outsiders. She is a great guard dog; she prevented a burglary of my home 7 years ago. She is now 14 years old with a heart condition but she is as spunky as ever.

So, it's the individual dog and the circumstances that the dog is in at the time of the attack. I speak to the health officers/prosecutors about this when they are trying to label a dog as dangerous. I'll often observe the dogs under different circumstances to see how they respond. If it is a shelter animal, I'll observe to see how the dog reacts to different people. (Of course, I have an ACO watching in case the dog turns on me!) I try not to go into those types of situations alone.
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Old 06-08-2009
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I know I’ve posted this before, but I still think it’s a good way to “humanize” bsl.

The majority of old west gunfighters had blue eyes, so by applying bsl standards, blue eyed people should not be allowed to own guns.
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Old 06-08-2009
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The only thing I saw on that site worth 2 cents is the staying safe page.

One, if not the worst, excluding the two human victims that were killed by, yes, I hate to admit this, Pits, was a 9 year old spayed female Dobe (house pet) that chewed up her 16 month old human sister. Mom was folding laundry in the living room, the dog was laying in her "special place" (a braided rug in front of the sliding glass door) and the toddler was doing what toddlers do. Mom left the room to put the folded laundry away in a bedroom and left the toddler and dog unattended. We can only assume that the toddler approached the dog in an "aggressive" manner and the dog reacted to the threat. It was horrific, this beautiful baby underwent 5 hours of surgery and over 250 of the tiniest sutures I have ever seen.

If the media had gotten a hold of this, the headlines would have twisted this into the dog mauling the innocent child. Truth is that Mom screwed up, she's just lucky that the baby survived.

We have had two humans killed by Pits in our county within the past 10 years, one was a 3 year old girl that wandered into her aunts backyard with 5chained Pits. Mom was in the house doing something more important than watching her child. I so wanted her (the mother) to be charged criminally. The dogs were "pitted" and all displayed evidence of fighting. Two of the dogs managed to grasp the child, one crushed her skull.
The other was an adult woman that owned two recently neutered Pits. The dogs were recently neutered after the dog owner wanted her Vet to euthanize them, due to aggressive behavior towards each other and other animals. The Vet talked her out of euthanasia and opted to neuter them instead. The Vet's Tech provided a written statement. The dogs were involved in a fence fight with neighboring dogs and the dog owner attempted to stop the fight, both dogs turned on her and her son when he came to her rescue. She was knocked to the ground or fell and the dogs killed her, her son was bitten numerous times as he attempted to pull the dogs off of his mother.

We are the superior beings and until we start to act as such, incidents like these will continue.

If I were to pick a on breed for it's aggressive tendencies, I would say that Dals are notorious face biters, but again the superior beings usually aren't acting superior.
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Old 06-08-2009
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I like it A LOT. There's always two sides to any issue and I'm always amazed at how the political agenda of some of folks on this board is as equally apologetic for the dogs as it is indifferent to the human suffering the dogs generate.

As ownership of dangerous dogs becomes increasingly criminalized (as I believe it should) sites like this serve to move change forward.

The best way to "humanize" this discussion, to my mind, is for the mangled human victims to have a voice in it.

As the owners are held increasingly responsible the true liability of owning these animals will become apparent and the fate of the dogs will take care of itself.
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Old 06-08-2009
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Quote:
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I like it A LOT. There's always two sides to any issue and I'm always amazed at how the political agenda of some of folks on this board is as equally apologetic for the dogs as it is indifferent to the human suffering the dogs generate.

As ownership of dangerous dogs becomes increasingly criminalized (as I believe it should) sites like this serve to move change forward.

The best way to "humanize" this discussion, to my mind, is for the mangled human victims to have a voice in it.

As the owners are held increasingly responsible the true liability of owning these animals will become apparent and the fate of the dogs will take care of itself.

Big Brown Dog,

I agree with you in the sense that someone needs to be responsible if they own a dangerous dog and it bites someone. I am one who owns an aggressive dog. I realized she was aggressive when she was two years old and investigated her past since I got her when she was 9 weeks old. It turns out that men/boys wrestled with her when she was younger. She did not think it was play as these men thought. She learned to bite when she did not like something. I was attacked by her when she was about 2. I was still a vet. student at the time. I contacted my professor who was an animal behaviorist. She thought the dog needed to be euthanized. I was studying to be a vet. and did not think that I could honestly recommend euthanasia of aggressive animals until I educated myself in training, etc. to see if these animals can be helped. Owning one would be the real challenge.

I worked with my own dog and was able to retrain her without medication. It took a lot of patience. I am a responsible person and I keep her away from strangers, particularly men. She is so sensitive about men that she actually chased some burglars out of my house; then did not allow police into my house either. I can control my dog and can get her out of a situation with strangers if I needed to.

Having said the above, not everyone is fit to own an aggressive dog.

I was supposed to be a witness to a case where the "aggressive" dog bit a child. The owner of the dog had done everything possible to separate the child from the dog when the child came for a visit. (The mother of the child and the owner of the dog were related.) The mother of the child jumped a dog gate and carried the child over. The dog bit the child. (There was one scratch mark over the child's eye.) I examined the dog for the bite release and the dog was the sweetest thing in the world. (She was a Chow Chow.) I wrote up the report. A few months later, I examined the dog for her routine examination and vaccines. While examining the dog, the dog began crying when I touched her knees. I asked my technician to hold the dog tighter in case something should happen. When I "pushed" the dog by manipulating the knees a little rougher, the dog began crying again and struggled to escape. When my technician did not let go, the dog tried to bite. To me, that is self-defense. This dog appears to have knee problems that act up with the weather changes. As soon as I let go, the dog stopped struggling and attempting to bite.

In most cases of dog bites where the dog is not aggressive, I found that the child (or other human) did something that caused the animal attack. The animal was just defending itself the only way it knew how. In the case where the Chow attacked the child, the owner of the dog was charged by the ACO when in reality, I feel that the mother of the child should have been charged since the owner of the dog did put up a gate to keep the dog from the child. To me, the mother put the child in danger just as if she turned her back and the child walked into moving traffic.

It is a shame that the humans are getting hurt but a lot of times it is the person's own fault (or at least the parents' fault) when an animal injures the human. If an owner of an aggressive (or potentially aggressive) animal cannot control the animal, then the person should not own that animal. I also believe that if the "mangled" human being files false charges and a proper investigation is not conducted by the ACO, etc., the person filing the charges should be charged themselves for the pain and aggrevation that the owner of the dog has to face. It has become too easy in this country for people to file false charges. The victim of the false charges (and the animals they own) often are forced to negotiate with officials that are acting more like terrorists, threatening the victim of the false charges to do what they say or go to jail.

I'm the first one to say if someone did something wrong and they can negotiate it down to a smaller charge and both parties are in agreement, then fine. But, if you are innocent of the false charge, then you have a right to have a proper investigation performed before the charges are filed; if there is probable cause to file the charges and the accused feels that they did not do what they are accused of, they have a right to a fair trial. They should not be threatened of coerced into giving up their rights. I believe that we still have rights in America; our fore-fathers fought for our freedom from England's rule and yet in this country, we now have to fear false accusations/charges from municipal government/employees?
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Old 06-08-2009
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My issue is not regulating dangerous dog, nor is it holding the owner accountable. My issue is arbitrarily deeming a harmless dog dangerous simply because of its breed, but having to go through the whole due process thing for a dog that is actually dangerous.

I personally don’t like people having the ability to keep a dangerous dog in a populated area in the first place. I don’t think that dangerous dog regulations are worth very much because 1, the owner of the dog most likely knew it had the propensity to bite before the incident ever happened, and they had failed to prevent the incident. And 2, dangerous dog regulations are only as good as the owner’s dedication to following them. We can’t be there 24/7 to make sure they have muzzles on the dog, or that it is inside a secure enclosure, that is the owner’s responsibility.

I know I sound cold and cruel, but with thousands of perfectly good, healthy and safe dogs being euthanized every day, I have very little support for trying to rehabilitate a dangerous and potentially libelous dog for “humanitarian” reasons, when if it were euthanized, then one of the perfectly good, healthy and safe dogs could be saved.
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