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  #31  
Old 07-08-2006
carrie_cat carrie_cat is offline
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Default Re: Crazy v. CRAZY

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Kumpf
Now to address the them before the critters phase. Sorry - wrong answer there. When the mentally ill person begins to really disconnect from reality and animals are involved, I can show you HOARDS of HOARDERS that make your soul scream at the devastation that they dispense to the helpless animals in their care. They don't do themselves in before the animals although in some cases the animals get the last word (or snack)...
I was trying to distinguish between Hoarders and so-called Hoarders; I still contend that there is a difference. I've no doubt that mentally-ill, hoarders, would indeed make my soul scream. Not everyone with more than a statutory number of animals is a hoarder; many people keep a lot of animals in really nice conditions, give them plenty of love and attention and food and sanitation and so on. Just as most people don't see the true hoarder cases up-close, most people don't see the good multiple-pet cases that way either. We've all basically just said, that we would be good multiple-pet people. Doesn't mean we will all become hoarders.
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  #32  
Old 07-08-2006
carrie_cat carrie_cat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. Gianotto
Hi carrie_cat - while I agree that it is unlikely that Mark or I would become hoarders (you're right, its tongue in cheek) I think that the line is finer than we'd like to think.

I know of several rescuers who at one point were excellent rescuers.
Well, you're right, I think the line is very fine and maybe tenuous. I can't say I've known excellent rescuers who became hoarders; though I've seen rescue organizations of one or two people come, and then go - bankrupcy or divorce or some watershed event sometimes hastening the descent.

Maybe I just don't believe in the "excellent rescuer" as an individual any more. I've seen enough rescue to have come to feel that it takes an organized approach, with a lot of different kinds of minds and talents, to really do well in improving the lot for animals. I've seen people who are really good at staffing an adoption event -- but not all of them are good at doing a budget! I've seen people who are great at trapping (one of them actually would sometimes jump up and down for joy at finally having trapped the hardest to trap cat in a group!), but who couldn't talk to people.

More and more, I just see that it's true, you can become convinced of your own perfect reason so long as you only have to answer to yourself. I guess that shows that rescuers could in some cases become true hoarders. I guess, the trick is for rescue organizations to do all that they can to pull in the excellent rescuer individual, plug them into a support system, to keep them in the excellent rescuer class and out of the isolated, lonely hoarder class.
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  #33  
Old 07-09-2006
KeepItWegging KeepItWegging is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carrie_cat
Quote:
Originally Posted by A. Gianotto
Hi carrie_cat - while I agree that it is unlikely that Mark or I would become hoarders (you're right, its tongue in cheek) I think that the line is finer than we'd like to think.

I know of several rescuers who at one point were excellent rescuers.
Well, you're right, I think the line is very fine and maybe tenuous. I can't say I've known excellent rescuers who became hoarders; though I've seen rescue organizations of one or two people come, and then go - bankrupcy or divorce or some watershed event sometimes hastening the descent.

Maybe I just don't believe in the "excellent rescuer" as an individual any more. I've seen enough rescue to have come to feel that it takes an organized approach, with a lot of different kinds of minds and talents, to really do well in improving the lot for animals. I've seen people who are really good at staffing an adoption event -- but not all of them are good at doing a budget! I've seen people who are great at trapping (one of them actually would sometimes jump up and down for joy at finally having trapped the hardest to trap cat in a group!), but who couldn't talk to people.

More and more, I just see that it's true, you can become convinced of your own perfect reason so long as you only have to answer to yourself. I guess that shows that rescuers could in some cases become true hoarders. I guess, the trick is for rescue organizations to do all that they can to pull in the excellent rescuer individual, plug them into a support system, to keep them in the excellent rescuer class and out of the isolated, lonely hoarder class.
Has there been any ACO's that became animal hoarders?
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  #34  
Old 09-12-2006
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Default meeting someone special

Kimberleigh,
If you stop "looking" and just focus on other areas of your life, that's when your special someone will come around. I met my fiance 2 years ago when I was seriously not wanting anyone. We will be married within the next 2 years and I couldn't be happier.
We've had ups and downs, and sometimes I would rather be with the dogs than him (haha)
But I still love him and he is so proud of what I'm doing. He tells me I'm his hero everyday.

I'm rooting for you to find your "special someone"....
Oh, and I will be 23 in 2 weeks...



Cheers
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  #35  
Old 09-12-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeepItWegging
Has there been any ACO's that became animal hoarders?
I don't know of an ACO who has done it, but I'm sure there was/is one out there. Alison would probably know. I did hear that a privately owned, large animal shelter in LA was busted for hoarding about two weeks ago. And, locally, several of our humane failure-to-care cases have been ex-show dog people or ex-rescuers or both.

But that need to be needed, the need to "fix it" whenever you see something in trouble, is the biggest strength and the biggest weakness in this job. Let's face it. There you are, the ideal ACO, out on a call and bending anything you have to -- time, space, your dispatcher, the neighbors -- to your will, so that you can protect whichever animal you're protecting at that moment. And then the next call comes. And the next one. And before you know it, you're exhausted and it's 12 hours later. And you go home and your neighbor's dog is in trouble. And you collapse and wake up, and your animals need some time for a change.

And what we all need to recognize, really recognize, is that if we worked 24 hours a day 7 days a week, we wouldn't be able to give enough to make every animal in every call-out even safe, not to say healthy and happy. And even IF we could handle the number of calls to our agency, there would still be the animals no one calls about. And even IF we could some how miraculously get help to all those animals, then that gives us the time to start obsessing about the next jurisdiction over, the one without an AC program.

Thanks to our so-called civilization, the need is infinite. Our strength is not.

So you give what you can, and inspire others to give too, so that they can take on the part you can't. And then, at the end of the day, you go home and let God do the work for a while. He can cope just fine without you, and He likes all of His animals safe, healthy, and happy. That includes you.

Or, like the stewardess says, "If you're sitting next to a child, or next to a civilization that's acting like a child, put your air mask on first."

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It's not what we have in our life, but who we have in our life that counts. (J.M. Lawrence)
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  #36  
Old 09-15-2006
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Yeah....back to the original post....aint life grand....my girlfriend just left me and started playing for the "other team". I am 28 and am already crazier than a bag of hammers. I'll prolly have about 40 rotties, 10 snakes, and 100 spiders and live in a log cabin in the bush. Hrmmmm....that doesn't sound too bad now that I think about it.
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  #37  
Old 09-18-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellie
Perhaps its just me but I have found the whole relationships and kids thing to be over-rated....ME time is precious....maybe we are all just different.
Plenty of stereotypes exist as to what people “should" want in their lives and what leads to fulfillment. Who is to say what a fulfilled life is supposed to look like? I may choose to stay single or just not find a satisfying, long-term relationship, but this does not mean I won't be content. Life is made up of so many elements...including passionate pursuits, good friends, and perhaps a meaningful career that allows you to be part of the solution...not part of the problem (hey, I can be just a bit idealistic).

As to “Me” time, I think that it is important for everyone to have some of this. People who work in careers that necessitate a lot of emotional energy have to be particularly careful that we don't burn out caring for everyone else but ourselves.

"Me" time also helps people learn more about who they are, what they truly value and want in life, and...sometimes even more importantly...what they do not want. Even though I am sure it is pasted on a corny plaque somewhere, I believe that "knowing yourself" is really essential to finding and maintaining good, healthy relationships...romantic or otherwise.

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  #38  
Old 09-19-2006
carrie_cat carrie_cat is offline
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Default Ah, life

Winnie, YOU ROCK. That was an absolutely amazing post. Thank you!

DogFace, you know, mourning that relationship is a normal thing. I'm really sorry! When I was a young woman, and my first *real love* went bad, I remember finding that Goethe quote, "That which does not kill me, makes me stronger." (Goethe? Or maybe Nietsche? Gaaaah, my mind is going. ... )

It really does, although it sure does HURT at the time, huh? I LOVE my life today, but it is nothing like I would have imagined, when I was crying about that relationship. I am absolutely certain that going through that loss made me a much more caring person though. Yes, I admit that my cat stood by me really well as I grieved, and probably that added to my feeling of love for felines. I think that probably makes me LESS willing or able to put them or myself into a hoarding risk situation.

Okay, cue Barbra Streisand, singing, "People ... People who need people..."
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  #39  
Old 09-21-2006
hollycat hollycat is offline
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Default back to the original post

Dogface, I am sorry for your loss, too. Break-ups are always an upheaval, some more than others. You may find comfort in reaching out to those closest to you..family and friends...furry, hairy (animal or not). They can be good reminders that we are all trying to navigate in this complicated, mixed-up world.

Dogface and KeepItWegging, for what it's worth, you could yet be pleasantly surprised by what the future brings. Although the unexpected can be frightening and threatening, it is also a wonderful aspect of life and love. Who knows what...or who...will be around the next corner...

In the meantime, take care of yourselves...share, laugh, do what you enjoy, and try to remain open to what inspires you.
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People ask me, \'How can you stand to listen to so much pain and sadness?\' I usually answer, \'It\'s a price worth paying for hearing so much courage, determination, and joyful realization.\' - J. Bugental, therapist
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