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Old 06-07-2011
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Default Parvo is it becoming an issue everywhere?

I know that Parvo has been out there for a long time. Sometimes you hear about it and sometimes it is as if it never existed. I recently picked up a puppy from an area known for gang violence(Bloods) and drugs. No one wanted to talk and no one knew anything. The local vet checked it and it tested positive for parvo. He was holding for observation and stated that if the puppy's health got worse, he would put it down. The puppy is extremely emaciated and was said to have passed blood in its stool and could not keep food down. I was advised that Parvo is coming back and it has been seen alot in South Jersey and could get worse. Is this a problem in other states and if so, any comments?
Thanks for reading, and would be interested in your comments.
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Old 06-07-2011
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Parvo is pretty much the way of life here. I keep test kits on hand so I can be sure itís Parvo and not another type of intestinal issue. The protocol used to be when we had a Parvo dog we had to euthanize everything, tear the shelter apart, bleach everything and start over again. That may still be the case if you only have chain link between the dog runs, but if you have properly sealed walls between the runs they just want us to do a deep clean/disinfect and then sit tight for a week or so to see what happens. Every summer, virtually every shelter around here will stop adoptions at some point due to Parvo.

I had one dog die in its own back yard from what we suspected was a poisoning. The vet did a snap test for Parvo, and it was negative so we sent samples to A&M for toxicology. They did however determine the dog was pregnant during the necropsy which was a total surprise to the owner. When the tox came back the lab had found it to be Parvo after all and the snap test didnít show it. About a week later I heard that a dog down the block from the Parvo dog had also died from apparent Parvo. That do was out all the time, so it had apparently picked it up somewhere and took it to the other dog when he got her pregnant, so yes, a dog can contract Parvo without ever leaving its own yard.
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Old 06-07-2011
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We vaccinate the second a dog walks in the shelter, and I don't want to jinx myself, but its really slowed down parvo here. Parvo has long been a problem in Ohio! I once heard that it can live for 9 + years in soil where a dog with parvo has defecated.

I was recently talking with a vet who has had phenomenal success adding a holistic remedy to traditional parvo treatment. 95% cure rate! Can't remember the name of the herbs...I'll have to ask him again.
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Old 06-08-2011
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One of the hospitals I started working at initially about 13 years ago, had 20 puppies come down with parvo. I pulled 16 of them through it because I recognized it for what it was early without the tests. When you see that many cases, you can know what it is from the moment it comes in. There is definitely a "pocket" situation. The hospital I mentioned catered a lot to poorer communities; that's where the parvo was coming from. It was also a "breed" thing with Rotweilers, German Shepherds and Pitbulls being more popular. Was it because these breeds were more common with those neighborhoods or was it just that these breeds were predisposed, who knows?

Where my practice is located now, which is really only the next town over, I get one parvo case every 3-4 years.

Working as an ACO last summer, I saw two cases while only working the weekends. That was a poorer community as well.

I'm going to a parvo lecture this week. They are supposed to be addressing "new" information about parvo. Not sure if this is going to be vaccine related only, or what. It is being sponsored by a drug company so they might have modified their vaccine. I'll post if I learn anything new at that lecture.
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Old 06-10-2011
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Bravo for vaccination on INTAKE. I would think logically, that should greatly cut down transmissions, even though part of me wants to object that it could mean overvaccination, and that the time required to produce immunity after the vaccination might mean the protection wasn't so useful as we'd like.

Parvo is a disease that mostly hits animals that are vulnerable for some reason, animals that are not in tip-top shape. So neonates, and seniors, and animals that are undernourished probably are more prone to get sick from it I think ( pending what Drnegrin6 comes back to tell us, I don't pretend to be a vet or an immunologist).

I think that getting vulnerable dogs and cats OUT of the close confined environment of a pound or shelter, would be a high priority to control and prevent spread of infectious diseases. That would mean, ramp up the foster program, move animals into foster homes where the population density is way lower. Stress should be lowered for most of those animals because they're in a quieter, more natural environment for them.

I suspect that if Parvo is on the rise, in the community, that probably is connected with lower living standards generally for families. So, where job losses and foreclosures have hit hardest, there might be more litters and dogs and cats that are being underfed; fewer that see the vet when needed; less time spent by the family on play and care of the pet (because they're job or house hunting).

I really like the pet food pantry programs and I wish they were more popular and better-organized and had wider coverage, for today's families that want (and need!) to keep their pets but have trouble feeding themselves, much less their pets.

Isn't Parvo self-limiting and can't it be successfully cured with careful and attentive supportive care? One of my vet friends used to talk about saving a litter of puppies with Parvo, mostly with warmth and subq fluids.

I had chicken pox and measles as a kid -- and LOOK! I still am living and thriving! (Not everything needs to be vaccinated away, IMO!)
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Old 06-10-2011
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Definately a re-emergence in South Jersey!
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Old 06-10-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carrie_cat View Post
Parvo is a disease that mostly hits animals that are vulnerable for some reason, animals that are not in tip-top shape. So neonates, and seniors, and animals that are undernourished probably are more prone to get sick from it I think ( pending what Drnegrin6 comes back to tell us, I don't pretend to be a vet or an immunologist).

I suspect that if Parvo is on the rise, in the community, that probably is connected with lower living standards generally for families. So, where job losses and foreclosures have hit hardest, there might be more litters and dogs and cats that are being underfed; fewer that see the vet when needed; less time spent by the family on play and care of the pet (because they're job or house hunting).



Isn't Parvo self-limiting and can't it be successfully cured with careful and attentive supportive care? One of my vet friends used to talk about saving a litter of puppies with Parvo, mostly with warmth and subq fluids.
OK, here's the latest scoop on parvo virus.....There is a new strain out there that is attacking older dogs!!! They had one test positive for the new strain in NJ according to the lecture from last night. So, it is in the state. It has been located in 2/3rds of the States in the US. The worse part is that the test kits sometimes test negative and it is the new strain of parvo!! They are calling the new strain 2c; the one that they had before (and still exists) 2b. The new strain is not the typical bloody type; it can be yellow diarrhea and still be parvo. The samples to send to a lab., if you are going to is the small intestines and the tongue....It seems to make lesions in the tongue.

The treatment is the same as the old strain, it is just harder to detect.

As far as the lower living standards, the first ones to report the strain were professional breeders that saw their puppies and the puppies' mothers dying from a disease that did not look like parvo but was wiping out their dogs. They called a virologist to the scene since they were losing a lot of money; the test came back parvo but with a mutant in the genome. This is what they are calling 2c. By the way, they are seeing this in raccoons as well.

Parvo is not self-limiting. It kills anything that gets it unless there is medical intervention to save the life of the animal. The first place that I worked as a vet. tech., we saw several cases of parvo, mostly coming from the poorer communities that could not afford to vaccinate. The first summer that I came back to work as the vet., I saw 20 cases. I managed to save 16 of those 20 because I was so familiar with parvo that I could detect it without the test kits. Now, the suggestion is to not even test; "If it looks like parvo, treat for parvo until proven that it is not parvo," as the lecturer said.

I just started writing for Examiner.com. Since this was an interesting lecture, I might be commenting further on one of my articles in the future. I'm going to see if I can get the lecturer to send me some of his information to post, or at least some decent pictures, etc. to write the article about what I found out.
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Old 06-12-2011
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Thank - you so much for the info on the 2c strain, where i live and work we are often called the parvo capital of Canada
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Old 06-14-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRNEGRIN6 View Post
Now, the suggestion is to not even test; "If it looks like parvo, treat for parvo until proven that it is not parvo," as the lecturer said.
Sounds like a good tactic! Thanks for sharing what you learned DrNegrin6!

And congrats on the Examiner gig!
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Old 06-14-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DRNEGRIN6 View Post
As far as the lower living standards, the first ones to report the strain were professional breeders that saw their puppies and the puppies' mothers dying from a disease that did not look like parvo but was wiping out their dogs. They called a virologist to the scene since they were losing a lot of money; the test came back parvo but with a mutant in the genome. This is what they are calling 2c. By the way, they are seeing this in raccoons as well.
This fits what I said -- newborns and animals under stress (of any sort). Puppies have undeveloped immune systems, and puppies' mothers, even in a great breeder's care, are dealing with the extra stress of recent whelping and then nursing and cleaning and caring for the litter. You'd definitely EXPECT to first see a new strain of a disease, in puppies and nursing mothers, where you mostly would consider a young adult, otherwise healthy dog, not pregnant or nursing, to be at lower risk.

I would still really like to see shelters farm out animals in those higher-risk categories, into foster situations. I just think that where you can reduce the density of population (that is, where you can have two or three dogs in a room instead of ten or twenty, as in shelters), you can provide a much healthier situation. And for animals that we know are at higher risk of catching something, like puppies and their mothers, we should be working toward keeping them from entering the shelter, through use of a foster network.
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