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Old 05-10-2010
kevrw7 kevrw7 is offline
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Default Woman sues after her dog was killed at animal hospital

http://www.examiner.com/x-21004-Joli...r-her-dog-dies
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Old 05-10-2010
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what the hell are their cages made from, cardboard? every vet i go to uses stainless steel...
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Old 05-10-2010
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Originally Posted by tomahto View Post
what the hell are their cages made from, cardboard? every vet i go to uses stainless steel...
They are saying cages in the report. I have worked in hospitals that do boarding and have chain-linked runs outside. I had a few dogs scale the chain-linked fences and jump out of the runs. I had one "dig" between the two runs, lift the chain-linked fence (the fence was not anchored at the bottom by cement/concrete) and get into the next run. It happens. When I worked as a technician, if I had an aggressive dog, I placed it on the far side of the hospital runs and made sure it was in a run that was covered overhead by chain-linked fencing as well. (The runs at that hospital were half-covered by chain-linked fencing; the run could be split in half to fit two dogs, if necessary. One dog would be in the chain-linked covered side, the other would have an "open roof".)

As far as the stainless steel cages, I have had a few dogs "chew" at the bars and managed to break several of the bars on the door. As of yet, I have not had one break out but several dogs have gotten their heads stuck between the bars. (This happened when I worked as a technician.) I did not have the strength to bend the bars to get the dog's head out so I would call the vets. and they would pull at the bars while I pushed the dog's head back out the bars. It happens, usually when the bars are old and have been soddered together when a previous dog has broken the bars. The bars are then weak and likely to break or bend. The cages in the hospital I own are over 10 years old. We get inspected every 2 years by the State. I make sure that the bars/doors are working appropriately to prevent these accidents.

Even when the cages are functioning normally, I have had animals hit the doors hard and "wiggle" the doors open. For this reason, we have resorted to locking each stainless steel cage/run when someone is not present in the hospital and when we have an aggressive or rabies suspect animal in the hospital. The liability is too great not to take these extra precautions.

The State of NJ is now recommending that consent forms for any animals staying at animal hospitals overnight state that there is no overnight staff (if the animals are staying alone in the hospitals) so that the owners know that there is a risk that something can occur overnight when the animals are left alone. I recommend the critical animals be taken to a 24-hour facility. Unfortunately, many people cannot afford to keep them in such a facility and take the risk of leaving them at animal hospitals overnight.

Along the lines of kennels/shelters, I have seen an aggressive dog scale the chain-link fencing and hurt a dog in the next cage over. This dog was being held in regard to declaring the dog potentially dangerous vs. viscious. I warned the ACO that the runs should be covered over as well as the Health Officer; they did not listen. The dog in the run next door was attacked around the neck region. The ACO lied to me and said that he found the dog injured in the run. It was not until months later that he told me the truth.

That is the dreaded fear that vets. have; finding a dog injured/killed/dead in a cage or run. It is not just the lawsuit since everyone knows that accidents happen, but the feeling of, "Could I have done something different to prevent this?" Or worse, "Why did I not fire that employee? I told them what to do with aggressive dogs...., etc." It has happened to me where I gave instructions to a staff member and heard them relay the message completely wrong to clients in front of me. Then, I have to take the phone from the staff member and correct the instructions, etc. and then speak to the employee about relaying a message exactly how I said it. A few words difference can make a big difference in how a patient is treated, whether or not a case is an emergency that needs to be seen immediately, vs. the case can wait until an appointment slot.
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Old 05-11-2010
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Good for her, I don't know about 50 grand, but I have heard of people getting paid more for less. I say good for her becuase I just thought of my reaction to hearing "I'm terribly sorry, but your pet was attacked and killed by another client's Pit Bull" I think the rest of that story would be ACOfunstop worthy
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Old 05-11-2010
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Apparently, the Pit Bull has had a history of being aggressive and the animal hospital staff was aware of the dog's aggressive tendencies towards other animals.
If this dog have documented history of aggression as described why was it still breathing? She ought to also sue the owner of the dog also for keeping a documented vicious dog(I assume the hospital doesn't own it).

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Originally Posted by tomahto View Post
what the hell are their cages made from, cardboard? every vet i go to uses stainless steel...
You'd be surprised what a dog can chew through given the proper (in their little pea brain) motivation.

We had a 60-70 pound shep mix at large in our area a while back that we chased around for at least 2 months. We started calling him "Cooper" after D.B. Cooper, the guy that hijacked the plane many years ago and bailed out ad was never caught. I even hit him with 2 tranq darts one day and he never went down! He was running in an area between our city and a neighboring city (they were continually trying to catch him too). Anyway, he wasn't aggressive, just a traffic hazard, and one day a citizen that had a bitch in heat with them lured him into their car. (This happened in the neighboring city) It was after hours so the PD at the neighboring city put him in an outside holding cage at their shelter. It was made of standard steel chain link fencing and was inside a security fence. The next morning when the staff arrived there was a hole chewed in the chain link, blood all over, and their large wrought iron security gate was knocked off of it's track and the dog was gone. They somehow caught him a few days later (I don't remember what they said they did to catch him that time). He actually turned out to be a nice dog once he got used to people. But, before that, I wouldn't have thought anything could get out of a good chain link fence kennel.
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Old 05-11-2010
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Granted I don’t make it a practice to visit the kennel areas at vet clinics that often, but the ones I have been at usually have several runs/cages that are either steel or cinder block. The second shelter I worked at had chain link between the runs, so I had to cover 2 with sheet metal to make them pass quarantine inspection, and they were also the aggressive dog runs. I have used T Kennel for the last 10 years, and the only escapes have been through the guillotine doors or human error where somebody would leave the main door unsecured.

I used to have to deal with a subject who had a malamute/wolf hybrid, and that was one huge and powerful dog. He had a good quality chain link “cage” with a concrete floor to contain it in, but when the dog wanted out, he would just start at a corner and open it up like a can O Spam.
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Old 05-11-2010
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I doubt she will be able to get 50k, not here in NY but if the dog attacked her then we would be talking money. But the real kick in the nuts is the free year of vet service's! Dog is dead! If she has anymore animals I doubt like hell she would be going back there!!!
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Old 05-12-2010
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"According to a report from the Grundy County Animal Control, the Pit Bull managed to chew through the cage and pulled Tootsie through the opening. Apparently, the Pit Bull has had a history of being aggressive and the animal hospital staff was aware of the dog's aggressive tendencies towards other animals."

IF this is true, why was the animal hospital boarding the pit? It's a private business, they have the right to say no.
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Old 05-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzk10 View Post
"According to a report from the Grundy County Animal Control, the Pit Bull managed to chew through the cage and pulled Tootsie through the opening. Apparently, the Pit Bull has had a history of being aggressive and the animal hospital staff was aware of the dog's aggressive tendencies towards other animals."

IF this is true, why was the animal hospital boarding the pit? It's a private business, they have the right to say no.
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Old 05-12-2010
DRNEGRIN6 DRNEGRIN6 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzk10 View Post
"According to a report from the Grundy County Animal Control, the Pit Bull managed to chew through the cage and pulled Tootsie through the opening. Apparently, the Pit Bull has had a history of being aggressive and the animal hospital staff was aware of the dog's aggressive tendencies towards other animals."

IF this is true, why was the animal hospital boarding the pit? It's a private business, they have the right to say no.

It's not just money. It does not look good if an animal hospital cannot control a dog, even if it is aggressive. The owners of the aggressive dog will often say that the vet. hospital somehow "discriminated" against them. They will say that the owner had an emergency and the vet. refused to help. Trust me, I have had my share of wacky, for lack of a better word, clients that I have wanted to get rid of but could not. Unfortunately, if you do not get rid of the client before the animal becomes ill and you start a treatment, you are stuck with the client. I'm not sure what the circumstances of why the vet. took in this dog. I have taken in aggressive dogs for ACOs but I'm the one that takes responsibility for the dog. I lock the cages up during the day for that aggressive dog. I also put a few cages between such dogs. My hospital now, only uses stainless steel, solid wall cages, except for the door. I have not had a problem with aggressive dogs getting out of this system.

When walking aggressive dogs, I walk them myself. I have had a lot of local residents who know me approach me to talk while I have such a dog on the lead. I yell at them to back up. Most of them do not listen and keep approaching so I have to turn the dog around quickly and walk/run with the dog back to the hospital to prevent a confrontation. They are less likely to do so if I where my ACO uniform. I have had to do this a few times when I have had dogs that I have held for my municipality (that I do not know how they are going to react around strangers) or when I am walking known aggressive animals.

The other thing regarding the vet. taking in aggressive animals; who is going to board an aggressive animal? The shelter??? No way. The kennel? Again, no way. It is either the vet. office, who can sedate the dog if necessary, or the dog is left alone at home with a neighbor, if lucky, to come and feed it, or the person can't leave town. I know for a fact that I was forced to leave my aggressive dog alone for eight days when I was hospitalized with meningitis. I was lucky that my dog likec my mother and she was as good with my mother as with me. My mother watched the dog and played with her for several hours but then had to leave her to tend to her own household. Not everyone has a family member or friend that can care for an aggressive animal.
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