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  #11  
Old 09-11-2008
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I changed to the Asilomar Accords statistics keeping ONLY. This helps track what is considered treatable and helps identify when resources are ever available where we can put those resources first. I have gone a step further and defined each euthanasia reason, so there is no confusion about the fact that I am not going to treat the parvo puppies and risk the health of the whole. I aim to have true numbers that actually defend the work of animal control. How many aggressive do we really see. It was rough getting them up and going, but I am a full disclosure open admission shelter that performs all animal control duties. These numbers are for anyone to see, review, scutinize, identify problems etc. It is what it is and usually stops people in their tracks when they have questions pertaining to the reasons animals are euthanized all the reasons and numbers are spelled out. At times they are amazingly good at times we see where we need more fosters, more events, or simply recognize where we need to obtain more resources for future seasons if there is a trend... Sorry for the ramble... In the end this is helpful, but I refuse to play the numbers game. I use this as a tool, not the end all be all of how I measure the success of Animal Control's efforts, just one tool of many.
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Old 09-11-2008
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Originally Posted by stmelangell View Post
But I'm a vicious, murdering animal control officer, I am, and what do I know?
What do ya know? Me too! I just had a debacle with a couple of advocates here. They are meeting to research and study to prospects of starting a TNR campaign here. I was on their e-mail list so I offered my expertise and advise. I was basically told not to bother coming to this study group. I was told that all the CDC's information was a lie regarding zoonotic disease's in feral cats. And that I shouldn't worry as it is easy to re-trap a bite cat that was trapped and released post surgery. Hmmm, I guess I've been doing it wrong all these years.
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Old 09-11-2008
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You guys crack me up. Oh, that pesky rabies issue,,,,,hello. Tell me do you think a child is likely to pick up a rabid feral kitten or a rabid raccoon,,,they better get their rabies protocols in order, but what is bad is animal control will get blamed for allowing it,,,ugh. I also like the one that if animals are spayed and neutered they don't bite and all their bad behaviors go away......hahhahahahahaha,,,,,and that has been sold as fact. We have our work cut out for us.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2008
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As for myself, the term “no-kill” needs to be in the pet peeve thread. Somebody started a rumor that we were going to be no kill when we built our shelter, and after 8 years of effort to educate people otherwise, that rumor persists. I have had people drive 50 miles to bring their animal to the “no-kill” shelter, only to be turned away by the staff because 1, we are by no means no-kill, and 2, we only accept animals from our own jurisdiction.

My experience has shown me that if people think there is a no-kill in the area they can dump their unwanted animal on, then they feel they are under no obligation to sterilize any of them. I want to be known as a quick kill shelter, and light a fire under these people that they need to sterilize THEIR own animals, because if they don’t there is a very good chance that THEIR litters may die in the shelter.
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Old 09-12-2008
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Originally Posted by ILUVMAXINE View Post
... And that I shouldn't worry as it is easy to re-trap a bite cat that was trapped and released post surgery. Hmmm, I guess I've been doing it wrong all these years ...
Yup, it's amazing how many of these good folks are suddenly armchair experts, now that there are some crazy idiots out there willing to publish happy-sounding falsehoods. What is that line ... "they don't like wholesome truth, but want to have their ears tickled, so they find any number of teachers to suit themselves." Yeah, like that.

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Originally Posted by Getting Too Old
... My experience has shown me that if people think there is a no-kill in the area they can dump their unwanted animal on, then they feel they are under no obligation to sterilize any of them. I want to be known as a quick kill shelter ...
Amen to that. Let's all just send all our extra kittens to Nathan Winograd's house for six months, shall we? That should help the whole discussion move forward ...
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Old 09-12-2008
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To GTO

I thought even when I was writing on this thread I felt myself leaning towards the pet peeve thread.

I have not had to euthanize a dog in 3 months and there is pressure from above to call our stats "No Kill", the term has only bad meaning to me. It is a movement that divides communities that should be working together. I adopted the Asilomar Accords so we would be comparing apples to apples in the community (only to find I was the first one to use it, when I thought it was standard) but I also defined the roles of all the types of animal rescue in the community. (All necessary) Open Admission, Limited Admission, Sanctuary, Rescue (no shelter fostering), etc. Each one of these places has a role and guess what they all agree that the agressive animals that can't be placed go to Animal Control. So, while my adoption rate is really good for adoptable animals I think it is disrespectful to the public and my staff to not count the animals that are euthanized (aggression, parvo, etc) and stand on a soap box and brag. I am a public safety enforcement agency that just happens to have enough resources to perform adoptions, fostering, humane education. But I know of so many animal control's even on person operations doing the most with what they have. I defend them all in what they do and do not agree with any movement that divides the communities.
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Old 09-12-2008
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I admit that I am a little hypersensitive to the term “no-kill”.

The first shelter I had contact with who claimed to be no-kill really set a bad tone for that term. No animal ever died in that shelter by the staff’s hands, in fact, they didn’t even have a license to by euthanasia solution. They shipped everything down to a local vet and he killed them so their actual euthanasia rate of the animals they handled was no better than anybody else’s, but they were proud of their claim to be no-kill.

The bad taste got worse when we opened our new facility in the spring of Y2K. Somebody started a rumor that we were going to be no-kill, and that rumor had spread like wildfire by that point, so every day when I opened the doors I had a line of people bringing their animals in. On Saturdays I would have so many animals coming in that I would have to store them in the truck when I ran out of cages, and on several occasions, I had to just lock the doors and euthanize every available animal to make space for the rest of the ones coming in.

After the initial year it settled down a bit and for about 3 years we adopted more than we euthanized, but that changed a few years ago. As I have mentioned before on this forum, there are 45 cities in the Ft. Worth phone book, we all connect like a ginormous jig saw puzzle, and most of us have our own shelters. Since opening ours, four adjoining cities have opened new facilities, and every time one of theirs opens, our adoptions drop. We have set new records for the most number of animals euthanized by the city in one year for the last 3 years running, and last year we were at 51%. It is not uncommon at all for me to euthanize 6 – 8 animals in the morning before I finish my cup of coffee, and I still have people traveling miles to surrender their animal to the ‘no-kill” shelter.

And what makes it the absolute worst is that the city allows me to tell people face to face that we are a kill shelter, but this rumor is so ingrained in the area, they won’t let me announce it publicly for fear of the political back lash.

We are a small city, and last year I killed 336 animals, but as of the end of August 08 I have only killed 146. What made the difference? For two years we had a low cost spay/neuter clinic coming to the shelter on an every other month basis, and that has cut down the number of litters coming in. From my point of view, and personal experience, we need to abandon ANYTHING related to being a no-kill, and apply those resources to providing low cost spay/neuter, and then the euthanasia rate will drop considerably from the lack of incoming animals.
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Old 09-12-2008
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...we need to abandon ANYTHING related to being a no-kill, and apply those resources to providing low cost spay/neuter, and then the euthanasia rate will drop considerably from the lack of incoming animals.
I'm changing my avatar ... "GTO for President!!! I Go GTO!!!"

In other words, no fraking kidding, mate. There you have said a mouthful. Enough with the expensive publicity campaigns and marketing materials already, and on with the inexpensive gonad negation plan ...
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Old 09-12-2008
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I'm changing my avatar ... "GTO for President!!! I Go GTO!!!"
I shall resist the temptation to go off topic and fill a whole page with a liberal dose of conservative opinions.
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  #20  
Old 09-15-2008
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In the state of Connecticut we have a APCP voucher (Animal Population Control Program) system that helps people who adopt our dogs and cats, to get them spayed or neutered. The person is charged $50 for an uneutered / unspayed animal, they get a APCP voucher, they go to a local vet that is part of the voucher sysytem, and the voucher will pay up to $100 for males and $120 for females to be sterilized and some of the dogs or cats shots, some vets in the system will do everything for the value of the voucher, and other vets the people have to make up the difference with. Also, we have a very good volunteer group that helps us with this, and they will get the dog or cat sterilized before the animal leaves the shelter, and the person who adopts that dog or cat makes a tax deductable donation to the volunteer group to cover the costs of sterilizing the animal.

When it comes to euthanising an animal, we have a 4 point criteria in which we follow.
1. the dog has to bite one of us for no apparent reason.
2, the dog has to be vicious, you can only safely remove the animal with a snare pole ( for at least the 9 day holding period), type of deal.
3. the dog has to have a bad bill of health from the vet,
4. No room, dog that has been here the longest gets put down first.
We have had to pts for 1,2,&3, but not yet for #4.
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