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Old 03-22-2011
chgodon chgodon is offline
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Default KETCHALLS

I watched a video of Chicago Animal Control removing a coyote off a bridge. The ACO was using a rope pole. My dept. uses the auto lock ketchall pole. This pole leaves one hand available. Isn't it harder using the rope poles? Both hands are tied up..one holding the pole and one holding the rope. There is no ratchet mechanism. Why are depts. still using this type of pole? I think there may be an officer saftey issue here. Please share your thoughts on your experiences with this pole. Do you like them? Hate them? I understand city/county budget may not be available for new ketchalls, but these rope poles have been used for years.
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Old 03-22-2011
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I can answer that...

Most of my ACO's prefer the pole you saw on the coyote vid. They say it gives them more control over the tension on the animal. Some use the Ketch-Alls as it is what they prefer to use. I did for most of career too, but when I got to Chicago and started using the homemade pole, I actually prefer it. Poor control is not an issue....officer safety is not an issue either. Been there 6 years now, and never had an ACO get hurt over control pole problems.
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Old 03-23-2011
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I use a homemade snare (control pole) as well. I don't use a rope but a thick diesel fan belt instead. I love it. Not only good for controlling the dog it is awesome for capturing. I can catch them on the run. See pics below....







Cheers, Scooterchic
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Old 03-31-2011
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Default ROPE POLE

when I first started in 2001 we had rope poles and they were ok with new rope. but after a while they weren't that great. I tried for a long time to get my department to bye katchall or tomahawks but it wasn't happening. so I ordered my own one 4 ft and one 6 ft. once my boss saw how well the worked and how easy to maintain he ordered one for everyone. Safety is very important in this job.
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Old 04-01-2011
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Scoot, dahling, I think you need more tape!!!
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Old 04-02-2011
carrie_cat carrie_cat is offline
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Some of the animal groups in my area have talked about purchasing poles for local agencies. We couldn't find training for any poles, though -- since I'm not an ACO, can someone tell me whether it's an "each one teach one" sort of skill or whether there is certification or training of some sort? Can't an animal be in danger unless the poles are properly handled, too? So far the groups haven't been able to resolve that concern, and so the purchases have not been made.
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Old 04-02-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carrie_cat View Post
Some of the animal groups in my area have talked about purchasing poles for local agencies. We couldn't find training for any poles, though -- since I'm not an ACO, can someone tell me whether it's an "each one teach one" sort of skill or whether there is certification or training of some sort? Can't an animal be in danger unless the poles are properly handled, too? So far the groups haven't been able to resolve that concern, and so the purchases have not been made.
Carrie cat,

I'm a veterinarian as well as an ACO/ACI. I remember when I first started working in an animal hospital about 21 years ago. I had never even owned a "real" pet (only birds and fish) at that time. After working a few months, one of the veterinarians came up to me and showed me the snare (rabies) pole and how it worked. He thought it would be a good idea that I know in case I needed to use it. Most of the time, I was able to handle the animals with a simple leash.

I remember the first time I had to use the pole. The owner veterinarian, who was an older, sickly man, was working on a dog that was aggressive. The dog turned on him and tried to bite him. The vet. rolled into a ball on the floor to protect his head/neck. I ran out of the room and grabbed the snare pole. While the dog was biting into his clothes, I managed to get the snare over the dog's head and pulled the dog off of my boss and outside into a run. I was shaking horribly since I did not know if my boss was injured and if injured, whether I had to drive him to the hospital or not. I ran back into the office only to have him yell at me since he had no idea that I had been taught how to use the snare.

He was glad afterwards that the other vet. had taught me but he thought initially that I took it upon myself to grab the dog without knowing what I was doing. In a hospital setting, it is a major liability since these animals are owned animals so if we injure the animal, there is a liability for a lawsuit. In most cases where an ACO needs to use a pole, the public safety comes first so if the animal is unintentionally injured, the liability is less than if a person becomes injured if the dog escapes.

The poles are relatively easy to use. If I was able to use one after one lesson at the age of 19 years, I'm sure trained ACOs should be able to use them. I have shown a few ACOs/police officers a few tricks that I picked up over the years since I've had to snare a few dogs over the 20 odd years that I've been working with animals. The only time that I had a real problem with the pole was with some long-haired dogs where the hair became entangled in the pole. For such cases, I have a pair of bolt cutters with me (either in the hospital setting or in the truck I use) to cut the snare if I have to. I have been lucky enough that the two times that this has occurred, I was able to free the dog without an incident.
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Old 04-06-2011
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Smile I agree on use of Ketchall poles

As an ACO I have many pieces of equipment at my disposal. I only use a lead rope if I am certain the animal will not cause me harm.
I am a defensive ACO, my choice of tool is the Ketchall pole. Over the years, I have learned to master this tool, and have two types. One is the one with a plastic coated cable with red rubber end, and the second is similir, but with out the coating on the cable, and it has an emeregency release pin on the side of the pole for those moments where the animal causes the cable to kink or jam.
I prefer control over something I must take in, and would like to go home to the family the same way I went to work, in one piece.
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Old 04-11-2011
carrie_cat carrie_cat is offline
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Thanks for the explanation DrNegrin6, I will pass the general info along.
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